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Gingival Papilloma or Lump on the Gums – Concern?

January 19, 2017

Filed under: Gum Surgery,Uncategorized — Tags: , — Dr Gillis @ 11:32 pm

What is a gingival papilloma?  Should you be concerned if you think you have one?  What treatments are available?

Small lump seen on gums between the central incisor and the lateral incisor is a gingival papilloma.

Small lump seen on gums between the central incisor and the lateral incisor in the photo to the left is a gingival papilloma.

 

A gingival papilloma is simply a lump of tissue on the gums as seen in this photograph.  The gingival papilla is a common location for a gingival papilla. If you see any lumps on your gums that you are concerned about you should ask your dentist for advice!

Gingival papillomas often have the following characteristics:

  • The gingival overgrowth usually occurs over time
  • They are usually painless
  • They may slowly increase in size over time
  • They can recur or return if removed
  • Often the only reason to treat a gingival papilloma is cosmetic – they look funny in a smile
  • They are usually pink, firm, and often lighter in color than the surrounding gum tissue
Gingival papilloma treated with a diode laser similar to this one.

Gingival papilloma treated with a diode laser similar to this one.

If the decision has been made between you and your dentist to remove the gingival papilloma this is usually a simple soft tissue surgical procedure.  If completed with a diode laser there is usually no bleeding and very little discomfort.  Your dentist may be comfortable removing gingival papillomas in her office as Dr. Julie Gillis does, or she may refer you to an oral surgeon or dermatologist.

Note same area in gums after healing for two weeks. Lesion treated with a diode laser.

Note same area in gums after healing for two weeks.  Gingival papilloma removed with a diode laser.

Gingival papillomas can be removed with a scalpel or more comfortably with a laser.  In our office, we do not see these lesions recur or come back but statistically they may.  If this happens, a second surgery – possibly deeper – can be completed.

Our office only recommends removal of gingival papillomas if they are bothersome or unaesthetic to the patient.  Often, we just point them out to you so that you can follow the gingival papilloma and note anything unusual such as redness, pain, rapid growth, or bleeding.

Yours for better dental health,

 

Julie Gillis DDS

Restoring Teeth/Restoring Smiles

 

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1190 Bookcliff Ave. Suite 201, Grand Junction, CO 81501 USA
Julie M Gillis DDS Grand Junction, CO cosmetic, general, & restorative dentist. (970) 242-3635 (970) 242-8479 jgillis@juliegillisdds.com