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Julie M. Gillis, DDS, PC Blog

Immediate Denture Home Care

March 12, 2018

Filed under: Dentures and Partial Dentures — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 1:16 am

HOME CARE INSTRUCTIONS FOR IMMEDIATE DENTURES

Provided by Julie M Gillis DDS                  Phone: (970) 242-3635

Immediate Denture Home Care:

An Immediate denture is a denture inserted on the day of tooth extractions.  The denture covers and protects the surgical sites and allows for immediate function.  The patient does not have to go without teeth during the healing phase.  There are a few important things to know about care of your immediate dentures and your mouth.  Dental offices may vary in their instructions to patients.  We have found the following to be very helpful.

Dentures come in all sized and colors. Take the time to care for your denture and your mouth and they will last a long time!

Instructions on Day of Insertion:

  1. Rest for the remainder of the day. Excessive activity may cause undue swelling and bleeding especially the first two days

 

  1. There will be some bleeding for 48 hours after surgery. Cover your pillow with a towel.

 

  1. You may be given a prescription for pain medication. Take this medication as directed.

 

  1. To minimize swelling, apply an ice pack 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off. After 48 hours, use warm moist heat, or a heating pad as needed.

 

  1. Food – A soft or liquid diet for 48 hours. Then take things gradually, working up to solid foods and chewing on both sides.

 

  1. You will be reappointed with your doctor 24 hours after surgery. DO NOT REMOVE DENTURES UNTIL THIS APPOINTMENT. If you must remove your dentures, replace within 5 minutes before the tissue can swell.

 

Denture Care After the 24-Hour Check:

  1. After the first day, you may remove your denture(s) and clean your mouth and dentures as often as you wish. A very soothing mouth rinse can be made by mixing ¼ tsp baking soda, 1/8 tsp salt, with 1 cup very warm water.  Use frequently.

 

  1. Clean your denture with a denture brush and liquid soap. Clean your gums with a soft brush and mouth rinse or water.  Don’t forget to clean your whole mouth and your tongue.

 

  1. Keep your denture(s) in your mouth at night until the surgical areas have healed, approximately 3 days. After that you can remove the dentures at night and place them in water or a denture cleaning solution.

 

  1. If sutures were placed, they will need to me removed 5 to 7 days after your surgery.

 

Regular Denture Care:

  • As healing takes place, there will be some shrinkage of the bone and gums. Your denture(s) may feel loose. When most of the shrinkage has taken place (usually 3-6 months after surgery), the immediate denture should be relined with a more permanent material. You may use a denture adhesive to help your denture feel more stable. Additional reline(s) may be needed over time as your mouth changes

 

  • Our office includes denture adjustments for 6 months.  Ask your dentist what is included!  For the best result, you must wear the denture for 4 hours prior to the adjustment appointment so the doctor can see where it is rubbing.  Appointments after six months will incur an office visit charge plus charges for other treatment completed.

 

  • Your dentures should be removed during sleep to allow better blood circulation to the gums and minimize bone loss.

 

  • Always keep the dentures in water or cleaning solution when they are removed from the mouth to prevent drying out. Scrub your dentures gently everyday using a specialized denture cleaner or liquid soap. Clean your gums and mouth daily too.

 

  • The body is always changing. Your gums will also change.  We recommend that you have your dentures and your mouth checked yearly at our office.  We will clean your denture and provide an oral cancer examination.

 

Please call our office at 970-242-3635 if you have any questions or concerns!  Our office is located in the Grand Junction/ Palisade/ Fruita area of Colorado, but we see patients from many miles away also.  

Yours for better dental health,

Julie M Gillis DDS

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

 

Night Guards – What are they? Who needs them?

March 2, 2018

Filed under: Night guard,Removable Dental Appliances — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 7:12 am

Night guards!

Night Guards – What are they? Who needs them?

Do you need a night guard? What is a night guard?  Is a night guard the same as a mouth guard? How are night guards made?  These questions and more are answered here!

This custom made hard acrylic night guard provides many benefits!

If you clench or grind your teeth at night – or during the day – you are not alone!  You may do this and not be aware that you have this habit.  It does not always make noise.  You do not always have symptoms that you, yourself would notice.  Your dentist or dental hygienist should notice though.  You may need a night guard if you have the signs or symptoms of occlusal (the biting surfaces of the teeth) disease or soreness in the jaw muscles.  See more below for reasons why it is so very important to understand and treat occlusal disease.  If treated early the difficulty and cost of treatment is minimal!

Occlusal Splints and Night guards

There are several different kinds of night guards that we may recommend for you.  Some are shown here.  They may be made on either your upper or your lower teeth and they are very comfortable to wear once your mouth has gotten used to them.  They can be thick or thin (depending on the goal) and they will generally cover all the teeth in one arch or just the front teeth.

The signs and symptoms of occlusal disease or abnormal wear of the teeth should not be ignored! 

Abnormal wear due to occlusal disease. A night guard will not reverse this, but can prevent further destruction.

The damage to tooth structure may be painless but it will continue and probably increase over time.  The following list of information related to occlusal disease is excerpted from courses with Dr. Peter Dawson.  Dr. Dawson has taught over 30,000 dentist and technicians principles of occlusion and TMJ therapy.  The characteristics of occlusal disease are the following:

  • It is the #1 dental problem causing destructive
  • It is the #1 contributor to the loss of teeth
  • It is the #1 reason extensive dental treatment is needed
  • It is the #1 reason that people have pain in their jaw muscles and TMJ
  • It is the #1 cause of structural damage to the teeth
  • It is the #1 reason for tooth pain

If you are clenching or grinding your teeth, you may also have one or more of the following:

  • Excessive (compared to what is normal for the chewing of food) wear of the teeth
  • Pain or tenderness in the chewing muscles
  • Headaches
  • Stress – It should be noted here that clenching or grinding will not improve stress!

Please share your concerns with our office and we will let you know is a night guard would be beneficial for you!  Our office cares about you and your teeth!  Please call our office at (970) 242-3635 to schedule an appointment or to ask any questions.  We would love to have you ‘Like” us or Follow us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/juliegillisddspc/

Yours for better dental health,

       Julie Gillis DDS

Restoring Teeth/Restoring Smiles

 

KöR Bleaching Can Return Your Smile to its Brighter Days!

February 27, 2018

Filed under: Tooth Whitening or Tooth Bleaching — Tags: , — Dr Gillis @ 10:31 am

Return Your Smile to its Better, Brighter Days!

with KöR Bleaching

We are very excited about the great success we are having with the KöR Deep Bleaching System!  Even teeth that couldn’t bleach with other systems are doing very well with KöR bleaching.  Our office offers several methods of whitening including prefilled disposable trays, in-office power bleaching, and take-home whitening gels and custom-fitted trays.  We will help you choose which system will work best for you!

Before KöR bleaching

After KöR bleaching

The KöR Deep Bleaching System is a blend of in-office and at-home treatments with a more potent and effective gel.  Whitening agents are inherently unstable and lose their effectiveness with time at room temperature.  The KöR whitening agent is refrigerated during manufacturing and delivery before we refrigerate it at our office.  This insures that the gels are more potent and effective.

The chemicals that are used to stabilize other systems and sometimes result in more sensitivity are not included in the KöR gel.  In addition, our custom-made trays insure that the whitening gel remains in contact with your teeth without being diluted or broken down by your saliva.

Key Benefits to the KöR Deep Bleaching System

  • Stronger more effective bleaching gel
  • Custom trays insure longer contact time
  • Enhanced sensitivity protection
  • Deeper effects and longer-lasting results

If you or someone you care about is concerned about your dark teeth and have not had success with other attempts at whitening, give us a call because we have a solution that will work for you! One of the things our patients truly love is brightening their smile.  Our office would love to discuss options for you!  Please visit our website at www.juliegillisdds.com to see more bleaching success stories.

       Julie Gillis DDS

Restoring Teeth/Restoring Smiles

Denture Home Care Instructions

February 19, 2018

Filed under: Dentures and Partial Dentures — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 6:47 pm

Home Care Instructions for Your New Denture(s)

Provided by Julie M Gillis DDS    Phone: (970) 242-3635

 

So, you have dentures?
Here is how to care for your new denture.

Dentures can make a huge difference in your smile.  You can look better, feel better and eat better.  It is important to properly care for your denture and your mouth.  Here are some of our office‘s favorite home care instructions for your denture.

Care of your Denture and your Mouth:

  1. If you get any sore areas, a very soothing mouth rinse can be made by mixing ¼ tsp baking soda, 1/8 tsp salt, with 1 cup very warm water. Use frequently.
  2. Clean your denture with a denture brush and liquid soap. Clean your gums with a soft brush and mouth rinse or water.  Don’t forget to clean your whole mouth and your tongue.
  3. Do not try to adjust your own denture. Your denture could become loose if too much is removed!
  4. Call our office to schedule an appointment to adjust your denture. Wear the denture for at least four hours prior to your adjustment appointment so that we can see the sore areas and adjust your denture more accurately.

 

Regular Denture Care as recommended by our office:

  • Your dentures should be removed during sleep to allow better blood circulation to the gums and minimize bone loss.
  • Always keep the dentures in water or cleaning solution when they are removed. Scrub your dentures gently daily using a specialized denture cleaner or liquid soap. Clean your gums and mouth daily too.
  • The body is always changing. Your gums will also change.  We recommend that you have your dentures and your mouth checked yearly at our office.  We will clean your denture and provide an oral cancer examination.
  • Over time there will be some shrinkage of the bone and gums. Your denture(s) may feel loose. You may use a denture adhesive to help your denture feel more stable.
  • Your denture may need to be relined in the future to fit more securely against the gums. During a reline, material is added to the underside of the denture.  Our office can usually do a reline in one day.

We love improving a person’s smile, self esteem, and ability to eat!  We take great pride in the construction of your new denture and the follow up care you receive.  if you have any questions about dentures or any other dental procedure, please call our office and we would be happy to help! Our office sees patients from Moab, Utah; Fruita, Grand Junction, Palisade, Aspen and Orchard Mesa, Colorado and many areas in between! We appreciate the opportunity to serve you!

Yours for better dental health,

Julie M Gillis DDS

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

 

Individualized Dental Care Should Be the Norm!

February 9, 2018

Individualized oral health care – Individualized dental care. 

The way it should be!

Our office believes in individualized dental care for optimal health. 

Dental care should be individualized to the patient.  What works for you is not necessarily what works for other patients.  Every patient deserved individualized oral health care. 

Take something as simple as the notion that every person needs to brush twice daily and floss once per day.  While this may be nice in terms of warding off bad breath, it does not really apply to all people when they want their teeth and gums to be as healthy as possible.   I see patients who really do brush and floss based on these guidelines and they still have issues with gum disease, tooth decay,  and periodontal disease!  So, there is more to this story.  Achieving oral health should be the goal of our oral hygiene procedures.  Well health and nice breath!

Treating people as individuals is not a new concept but it is one that I don’t think gets applied often enough.  This is, of course, true in medicine as well as dentistry.  Two patients with the same presenting symptoms and tests cannot necessarily be treated equally and achieve the same results.

Probably not the best way to have individualized oral health care!

 

My son in law, Jeremiah Joyce, wrote this piece recently published in the Mayo Clinic’s KER blog. It looks at the risks and benefits of adopting guideline-driven care.

This from Jeremiah, “Minimally disruptive medicine (MDM) is one of the aims of the KER unit (http://www.mayo.edu/research/labs/knowledge-evaluation-research-unit/overview) here at Mayo and they are doing some cool personalized medicine research dealing with not just disease but what individual patients themselves bring to the table.”

 

Is Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) the way to best treat patients?  Does this apply to dental patients?  I think it does!

Jeremiah is a third-year student at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine.  Mr. Joyce responded to a writing prompt meant to develop his thoughts about the role of a primary care physician. The prompt: “The ideas behind MDM or contextualized care ask us to respect the needs and circumstances of the patient before us as we construct our care plans. But that puts us in a weird spot, yes? Because just as MDM is this decade’s push, last decade’s push was evidence-based medicine: the idea that, through science, we can find a ‘best’ way to handle a problem, a ‘best’ treatment. It becomes our job to apply the evidence with less and less spin to it, if we dedicate ourselves to EBM purity.” 

With that in mind, what is your opinion of the Minnesota Community Measures’ “D5” criteria (http://mncm.org/reports-and-websites/the-d5/)? What are the risks and benefits of adopting guideline-driven care? Do the D5 measures reflect a friendly contextualization of care?” 

Mr. Joyce’s response follows:

The Mayo motto “the needs of the patient come first” uses the singular noun; the patient is an individual. In practicing evidence based medicine, however, I think we often make the mistake of using population-based recommendations for individuals. There is an interesting precedent for the idea that a “one size fits all” model fits no one perfectly. In his book The End of Average, Todd Rose describes a U.S. Air Force study of pilot average body measurements, designed to tailor a cockpit that fit the average pilot. Out of over 4,000 pilots measured to determine the perfect dimensions, not a single one was within the average range in all of the 10 primary dimensions (Rose, 2016). This article is a fascinating physical example of a truth that undoubtedly applies to medical recommendations as well. 

In practicing medicine, we should focus on tailoring the recommendations to fit the patient, rather than forcing the patient to fit the recommendation. We are all aware of the benefits of D5 recommendations on the long-term health of populations, but we also know some patients have ASA-induced asthma and others have statin-induced myositis. Still others haven’t been able to quit smoking despite their best intentions. We as future providers risk losing a therapeutic alliance with patients if we push too far or too hard. Someone with a recent diagnosis of diabetes may quickly be overwhelmed if we add on all the D5 as soon as their A1c is at 7.1%. As Rose describes in his book, the Air Force’s solution to their cockpit dilemma was increasing flexibility in the design, allowing pilots to adjust their planes. This approach resulted in a dramatic decrease in casualties. We may see the same effect when we work with patients to achieve the greatest benefit to their health. Across a panel of patients, we would be much more satisfied with a population of half-treated and gradually improving diabetics than we would be with losing many patients to follow-up due to frustration and disappointment with a rigid healthcare system.

(Rose, 2016) “When U.S. air force discovered the flaw of averages.” https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/01/16/when-us-air-force-discovered-the-flaw-of-averages.htmlhttps://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/01/16/when-us-air-force-discovered-the-flaw-of-averages.html 

Jess, Jeremiah and Tigris

I love the part in the title above that states, ‘the flaw of averages’!  This ties right in to the need for individualized dental care.

So what do dentists need to address if we want our patients to have optimal oral health?  In my practice, we do a complete oral health assessment for every patient and tailor our recommendations based on our findings.  If someone shows no signs of gingivitis, trauma, or periodontal disease then their current regimen of oral hygiene is adequate from an oral health standpoint.  If we see signs of disease then we determine what changes can be made to improve their oral health.  Then we continue to monitor for signs and symptoms of disease to see if modifications need to be made.

I know that I want to be treated as in individual and I believe our patients do too.

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS

Caring For and Enhancing Your Smile

 

 

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