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Julie M. Gillis, DDS, PC Blog

Straighten Teeth with Porcelain Veneers and Braces or Just Veneers?

June 20, 2017

Filed under: Porcelain Veneers — Tags: , — Dr Gillis @ 7:15 am

Straighten Teeth with Porcelain Veneers and Braces or Just Veneers?

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth - corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth – corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth - corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth – corrected in two visits with porcelain veneers.

 

Should you straighten your teeth with Porcelain veneers and braces or just veneers?

 

 

The answer is not easy!  Braces are certainly not always needed.  See the photos here that show what is possible with porcelain veneers in our office!

There may be benefits depending on your choice of using porcelain veneers only or porcelain veneers and braces.  In general, if you choose to straighten your teeth with veneers without doing braces you can expect the following: (I will explain all in more detail below)

  1. Considerably shorter treatment time
  2. More shaping of your teeth
  3. There may need to be compromises in the result
  4. May or may not be longer treatment time in the dentist’s chair
  5. Treatment will probably be more expensive
  6. More of your teeth may need veneers than if you were to complete braces before your veneer treatment

Item (1) above:  Treatment that includes veneers and braces will often add 6 months or more to the overall treatment time)

Item (2) above:  When using veneers alone, your dentist will need to adjust just enough on your teeth to achieve your desired cosmetic result.  Your dentist should be able to review the pros and cons of this.  Ask a lot of questions so that you understand the treatment that is proposed.

Item (3) above:  Your dentist should be able to explain to you and/or show you photos and models that describe the result that you should achieve.  If may be that a slight compromise in the alignment of the teeth will still be wonderful for you and will save you months of treatment time and possibly a considerable amount of money.

Item (4) above:  If your dentist recommends veneers and braces it may be because just completing braces will decrease the number of veneers needed to achieve an ideal result.  Veneers and braces may both be recommended to achieve your goals as either one alone may not be enough.  Chipped or discolored teeth will still be chipped and discolored after braces.

Item (5) above:  The combination of veneers and braces will almost always be more expensive but the end result may be worth it!  Talk to your dentist to understand the recommendations.

Item (6) above:  This may or may not be true and will depend on your specific treatment!

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth - corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth – corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth - corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Severe crowding, flaring and tipping of teeth – corrected in one month with porcelain veneers.

Our office will often recommend the combination of veneers and braces to achieve a specific result but as you can see here, we can also make it look like you have been through several years of braces and yet your treatment time was only a month or so!  It is extremely important to select a dentist who excels at this type of treatment and who has your best interests at heart.  Please visit our web site at www.juiegillisdds.com for more information about our office.  Dr. Julie Gillis is an accredited member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and was the very first dentist in Colorado to achieve this honor.  She now serves as an accreditation examiner for the AACD as well as on the American Board of Cosmetic Dentistry.

 

What Happens to a Tooth After a Root Canal?

June 12, 2017

Filed under: Root Canal — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 7:09 am

What happens to a tooth after a root canal?

Close up after much of the decay and loose root canal felling material removed.

This photo shows a tooth that has had root canal treatment but the patient did not go through with any follow up care.  Close up photo shows what is left of a tooth after much of the decay and loose root canal filling material removed.

What should you know and understand about having a root canal so that your treatment will have the best success?

As a refresher, you should know the following:

  • And Endodontist specializes in root canal treatment.
  • Root canal treatment is the removal of the vital material inside a tooth – the nerve and blood supply – followed by cleaning and shaping of the now empty canal and then filling the root of the tooth with a safe material that the body will not reject
  • Root canal treatment is intended to eliminate infection and pain and allow the saving of a tooth
  • A tooth with a root canal can be saved for many years or a lifetime with proper care.
  • Root Canal treatment is about 95% successful

One of the endodontists, Dr. Clark, that our office works with sent this message to several local dentists (my additional comments are in italics),  “It has always been surprising to me when patients spend the time (and money!) on a root canal but do not return (to their dentist) for their full coverage crown.  I have to attribute that decision on how busy our patients are!  I have found that patient education in Western Colorado is very high: over 75% of my patients are aware when a crown is needed after their treatment.  (so their dentist has done a good job in educating patients about their tooth health after a root canal) But, they may not know that having the crown completed ASAP is vital to the long term success of the tooth! As you will see in the attached article (not included here), patients that delayed having their crown placed were more than three times more likely to have the tooth extracted!  (the bold comment was my addition!)  And that was only a delay of four months!

Tails of the previous unprotected endodontic (root canal) filling material, severe decay, and the most awful odor!

This photo shows tails of the previous unprotected endodontic (root canal) filling material, severe decay, and fractures.   The tooth had the most awful odor and will now require extraction!  The crowned tooth shown also has had a root canal and has been functional for many, many years.

Most endodontists remind and encourage patients to schedule their appointment with their regular dentist the week following root canal treatment, as they know how busy the patients are and also how busy their dentist’s offices can be. Our office recommends the following so that you will have the most successful outcome possible:

  • If you are getting a root canal completed on your tooth, find out if a crown will be needed before you start the root canal treatment and get that appointment scheduled as well.
  • Find out if the endodontist can complete the final restoration.  This may be possible if your tooth has an existing crown and the crown is functionally sound.
  • Find out the prognosis for your tooth.  Best estimate of success so that you can make good choices about your care.  Both the dentist and the endodontist should be able to tell you this.

When our office sends our patients to an endodontist to have a root canal completed, we strive to communicate with the endodontist’s office carefully so that they will help our patients seek the needed follow-up care.  The endodontists usually send their post operative letter and radiographs back to our office within 24 hours of treatment.  Please call our Grand Junction, Colorado office at (970) 242-3635 if you have questions about having a root canal and what we can do to help.  We always welcome your feedback!

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS, PC

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

Tomato – Fruit or Vegetable? Maybe it is both!

June 3, 2017

Filed under: Diet for Health — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 11:18 am
Tomatoes - Fruit or Vegetable?

Tomato – Fruit or Vegetable?  Both?

Tomato – Fruit or Vegetable?

They say it is important to eat your fruits and vegetables.  Shoot, I say that all the time!  Maybe it is time to respect the lovely tomato.  So, is it a fruit or a vegetable or both? Are they delicious?  There are so many different kinds of tomatoes and I love them!  Sliced for a caprese salad ( one of my favorites) with fresh mozzarella, and freshly made dressing with fresh basil – yum! Perhaps overuse of the word ‘fresh’ here but this is important for the best taste.

And with summer almost in full swing, local tomatoes should start rolling in from the fields and our home gardens more delicious than ever!  Let’s have some!

So which is true?  Is a tomato a fruit or a vegetable?  And, perhaps more importantly, does this have anything to do with dentistry?  Probably not, but I love tomatoes in all their forms and since our office is concerned about your overall health as well as your dental health this fruit (or is it a vegetable?) is a very good addition to most diets!  Just brush your teeth and maybe even floss before your dental appointments no matter what you eat.

  • Does it stain your teeth?  No, not in any permanent way.
  • Can they irritate your stomach?  Well, most tomatoes are acidic – some more than others – so this can be true.  Two good rules of thumb to apply here are ‘naught in excess’ and ‘know your stomach’!
  • Are they nutritious?  Yes!
  • Is it fun to try different colors and sizes of tomatoes?  Yes!
  • Are they hard to grow?  You will get different answers on this one!  I sometimes have incredible luck and sometimes the plants look healthy but the fruit is scarce.  I never seem to have the success we see every year when we go to the fields for several bushels of ‘pick your own’ tomatoes for our somewhat famous ‘Salsa Weekend’.  But I don’t really want to have that many on hand all the time.

We will try to be a bit more ‘Dental’ with our next blog.  Until then, from our office to you, may many happy and delicious tomatoes arrive on your table.

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS. PC

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health

Should I Have Surgery to Remove My Tori?

April 27, 2017

Filed under: Tori or Dental Tori — Tags: — Dr Gillis @ 6:05 pm

Should I Have Surgery to Remove My Tori?

Tori are extra bone that is present on the upper or lower jaw that may or may not require surgery.  Many people do not even know that they have tori!  Once the tori are ‘discovered’ they may cause concerns.  Because they tend to grow very slowly, they can often go unnoticed by people that have them.  Often it is a dentist who is the first to point out the presence of the tori.  This blog will show a couple examples of upper and lower tori and the surgical removal of a tori.

Tori on the upper jaw. Most common location is on the middle of the palate or roof of the mouth.

Tori on the upper jaw. Most common location is on the middle of the palate or roof of the mouth.

Tori on the lower jaw. Most common location is on the tongue side, or lingual side, of the jaw.

Tori on the lower jaw. Most common location is on the tongue side, or lingual side, of the jaw.

Tori have the following characteristics:

  • Very firm lump due to the underlying bone
  • Very slow growing
  • Painless except when bumped
  • Usually of unknown origin

 

 

 

Tori may interfere with dental appliances in which case they must be removed or the appliance modified to fit around the tori.  A partial denture is used to replace missing teeth.  If the partial denture covers the tori and the tori continues to grow, the partial may not fit as well over time.  If a major portion of a dental appliance covers a tori it may not be able to be modified sufficiently to allow continued wear of the appliance.

Tori may be present on one side of the jaw only like this one that is seen on the lower right on the tongue side of the teeth.

Tori may be present on one side of the jaw only like this one that is seen on the lower right on the tongue side of the teeth.

This tori is present on the lip side or buccal side of the teeth.

This tori is present on the lip side or buccal side of the teeth.

 

Surgery usually is completed in the office of an oral surgeon.  You can often sleep though this surgery if desired.  Prior to completing surgery to remove a tori, you should have a three dimensional xray taken of your jaws to determine the safety of completing the surgery.

 

Palatal Tori before removal

Palatal Tori before removal

Same area after removal of palatal tori.

Same area after removal of palatal tori.

Shown are before and after images of a palatal tori that was removed by an oral surgeon for patient comfort.

Our office will refer you to the office of an oral surgeon familiar with this procedure.  It is in your best interest to achieve the best result possible!

Porcelain Veneer Treatment for Bulimia and/or Severe Wear

February 28, 2017

Filed under: Porcelain Veneers — Tags: , — Dr Gillis @ 7:22 am

Porcelain Veneer Treatment for Bulimia and/or Severe Wear

Severe wear and erosion of anterior teeth makes these teeth look very small.

Severe wear and erosion of anterior teeth makes these teeth look very small.

Can porcelain veneers be used as treatment for bulimia and severe wear?

Absolutely!  The tooth destruction due to the acid from bulimia or anorexia nervosa or severe wear from any other cause should be addressed before any permanent treatment is comopleted.  You want the treatment to last!  If tooth wear is due to acid in any form or due to bad habits such as clenching and grinding your teeth and this underlying cause of the wear is not addressed the problem will continue.  Beautiful porcelain restorations are not any harder than natural enamel and the same problems could occur all over again.

Beauty and length is returned to the teeth with porcelain veneers.

Beauty and length is returned to the teeth with porcelain veneers treatment.

This blog does not address correcting the destructive habits of bulemia or excessive wear of the teeth.  If this is one of your concerns ask your dentist or medical doctor for help.  They will probably have recommendations to end these destructive habits!  The goal here is just to show what can be achieved with porcelain veneer treatment.  Maybe this very positive result will help someone suffering from the disfiguration in a smile that can result from these habits.

Porcelain veneer treatment has returned this beautiful smile!

Porcelain veneer treatment has returned this beautiful smile!

Note the short teeth in the before photos shown here and the improvement in the overall smile.  You can sense the personal confidence of the patient receiving treatment porcelain veneer treatment!  Our office would be happy to offer treatment options for improving your smile!  Treatment plans should be flexible to meet your needs.  Dr. Julie Gillis and her talented team have been restoring smiles and restoring health for many years.  We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you in our Grand Junction, Colorado office.  Please call our office at (970) 242-3635 for more information!

 

Caring For and Enhancing Your Smile

Julie M Gillis DDS, PC

 

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1190 Bookcliff Ave. Suite 201, Grand Junction, CO 81501 USA
Julie M Gillis DDS Grand Junction, CO cosmetic, general, & restorative dentist. (970) 242-3635 (970) 242-8479 jgillis@juliegillisdds.com