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Should I Use Dental Floss? Very good question!

Should I Use Dental Floss?

Should I use dental floss is a good question to ask with a couple different answers!

This blog responds to the recent news article that said in effect that no studies have proven that flossing or using dental floss is beneficial.  It is!!

Dental floss and other interdental cleaning aids. All great!

Dental floss and other interdental cleaning aids. All great!

The ADA News inquired recently about why flossing was not included in the federal dietary guidelines released in 2015.  The Associated Press noted the omission in an August news story that questioned the benefits of using dental floss. (See ADA News August 8th, 2016 article, ‘National media focus on floss; government confirms importance’ for many comments in this blog.)

Dental floss or the use of tools such as interdental cleaners really is an important oral hygiene practice! if you want to have healthy teeth, gums, and periodontal tissues!  Along with professional cleanings to remove what you cannot remove at home, brushing your teeth and cleaning between the teeth and below the gumline has been shown to disrupt and remove plaque and make your mouth healthier.  Plaque is the sticky film that contains bacteria and food that builds up constantly and must be disrupted daily to maintain or obtain health.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agreed to this in a statement August 3rd, 2016 (also from the ADA News article August 8th, 2016).

Flossing! Darn good for cleaning below the gums. And, it's FUN!!

Flossing! Darn good for cleaning below the gums. And, it’s FUN!!

Using dental floss - good for cleaning below the gums. And, it's FUN!!

Using dental floss – good for cleaning below the gums. And, it’s FUN!!

When the ADA News asked the governmental agency why the guidelines did not mention flossing or using dental floss to clean between your teeth, the U.S. Department of health and Human Services sent a statement that called flossing “an important oral hygiene practice” and said that by not mentioning flossing it did not imply otherwise.  The ADA News August 8th, 2016 article goes on to say that the ‘primary emphasis was on the nutrition-based recommendations to reduce added sugars’.

In our office, we often see the improved health changes that result from better oral hygiene practices.  Flossing is great especially when done well but there are alternatives out there for people that just don’t like to floss.  Such as soft picks, floss holders, the air flosser, water pics, toothpicks especially when used carefully in a toothpick holder that allows better access to the insides of the teeth.  We love to help our patients improve their oral health and we will be glad to come up with a plan that works with your life to help you achieve and maintain ideal oral health!

Yours for better dental health,

Julie Gillis DDS, PC

Restoring Smiles/Restoring Health